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Why N.B.A. Referees Agreed to a Covid-19 Vaccine Mandate

Late last month, the N.B.A. sent out a short news release announcing an agreement with the union representing the league’s referees to mandate Covid-19 vaccines. It stipulated that all referees must to be fully vaccinated to work games, including “recommended boosters.”

Otherwise, the statement said, referees couldn’t work.

The announcement came after a tumultuous N.B.A. season in which several referees had to miss games because they had been in contact with someone who had tested positive, sometimes forcing the league to call up G League officials to fill the gap.

The agreement was notable at a time when labor unions across various industries have been split on whether to agree to vaccine mandates for their members. Some unions, like the American Nurses Association, have supported mandates out of concern for members’ health, while others, most prominently police unions, have pushed back against mandates, saying they infringe on members’ rights to make their own health decisions.

The issue has become highly politicized, as have many restrictions around the virus. Vaccine mandates have long been common in schools and colleges, and are routine for travel between countries.

The National Basketball Referees Association represents 145 members who officiate N.B.A., W.N.B.A. and G League games, in addition to 50 retirees. Their agreement stands out in the sports world, and even in their own sport: No such mandate exists with N.B.A. players, creating a potentially awkward situation where some league employees are mandated to take the vaccine and others aren’t. (The league, however, has handed down guidance players on the Nets, Knicks and the Golden State Warriors must be fully vaccinated to play at home, since local rules stipulate that only vaccinated individuals can enter arenas.)

Of the 73 N.B.A. referees in the union — five of whom are women — 36 percent are at least 45 years old.

The N.B.A. players’ union did not respond to a request for comment on where it stands on vaccine mandates. In June, the W.N.B.A. announced that 99 percent of its players had been fully vaccinated. A spokesman for the N.B.A. said that number was approximately 85 percent for N.B.A. players, and that the league was “in discussions with the union on a variety of topics for the season including vaccinations.”

The N.F.L. and M.L.B. do not have similar agreements with their referees or their players that the N.B.A. has with its referees. The N.H.L. does not mandate its players or referees to get vaccinated but a league spokesperson said Monday that all of its referees have been vaccinated before the upcoming season. A spokesman for M.L.B. said that the league strongly recommends vaccines for all umpires and is now considering “adjustments” in light of the recent Food and Drug Administration approval of the Pfizer vaccine, but did not say whether that would mean a mandate. In March, the head of the M.L.B.’s players union, Tony Clark, said that the group he leads was against a mandate.

Marc Davis, the president of the basketball referees’ union and a referee himself for more than two decades, said in an interview that the agreement was born of a strong relationship with the N.B.A., and the referees were broadly in favor of the mandate.

This conversation has been edited and condensed for length and clarity.

Can you tell me how the vaccine mandate came about?

When you have a collaborative environment between management and labor, I think you’re constantly always working through issues and there’s a constant dialogue back and forth.

I think if I would have to say who introduced the idea, I think it’s more the relationship and the constant conversation that came up. I mean, clearly, this was something that’s really consistent with both of our mission statements, which is to provide for the care and safety and security of our members and their families.

It’s a shared view of vaccines that they are probably one of the top three inventions in the history of humankind. And to have this access to this innovative vaccine and allow us to continue to work, to do our business and to continue to work collaboratively, it’s not that difficult of a conversation to begin and to work through.

What’s the value of the mandate for the referees’ union if the players haven’t agreed to one?

Well, first of all, we’re our own independent group, and I think that the players will come to some agreement. They’re working out their issues as well. They may have different issues than we had or just a different pace. I can’t speak to them, but I’m certain that they will work through their issues as well.

The benefit of the mandate is that our officials are flying commercially. They have families they’re coming back to. We’re engaged in the business of basketball. We’re in intimate environments with our players. We recognize the importance of the vaccine. I think this will all work itself out on all levels among all leagues.

Was there a significant amount of resistance from those within the union whom this would affect?

From a numbers perspective, I would say no. But their voices were heard. We articulated their concerns. We worked through those issues. A principle issue that was of concern was the F.D.A. approval. And we worked through that issue to where one of the things we negotiated was that no one would be required prior to F.D.A. approval. So that’s kind of a common-sense approach to it. You know, obviously, F.D.A. approval came at or about the same time that we reached the agreement.

With the understanding that the players are your co-workers, was there resistance along the lines of ‘Why should we agree to a mandate if the players haven’t agreed to one?’

No, because we know that when we initially began our conversations that they had begun conversations as well. We just reached an agreement prior to them. We did it at our own pace. We weren’t concerned with another group’s decision.

How much did you follow what other labor unions were doing as you were doing your negotiations? Were you in touch with other referee unions?

We were in constant communication with the players’ association. We were in constant communication with the hockey, baseball and N.F.L. officials. Other labor unions, like the Southwest Airlines mechanics, the United Airlines employees. They had some very difficult things and they weren’t able to work through them. It turned out to be something other than what we agreed to. We just didn’t have that experience with the N.B.A. It never became a contentious butting of heads.

Do you believe that the players’ union should agree to one in the same way that you guys have?

It is not my position as executive of our union or a member of another union to discuss or to even articulate what I think someone else should or should not do. I think that they will do what is in the best interests of their constituency. We know the best interests of ours.

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Boxer Manny Pacquiao Joins Filipino Presidential Race

MANILA — Former boxing champion Manny Pacquiao has shuffled his way into the presidential race in the Philippines.

Mr. Pacquiao, the country’s best-known athlete, already holds a seat in the Senate but faces tough opposition as a presidential candidate. He was formerly the president of the PDP-Laban, the ruling party in the Philippines, before being ousted by a faction loyal to President Rodrigo Duterte, whose government Mr. Pacquiao has accused of corruption.

“To government officials who continue to rob government coffers, you will soon find others in jail,” Mr. Pacquiao warned on Sunday when he announced his candidacy. “Your time is up.”

The constitution bars Mr. Duterte from seeking a second six-year term in the May election. He has instead said he would run for vice president, in what some analysts have described as an attempt to avoid prosecution from the International Criminal Court. The I.C.C. last week announced an investigation into Mr. Duterte’s antidrug campaign, which critics have said was marred by extrajudicial killings.

Christopher Lawrence Go, a senator and Mr. Duterte’s longtime aide, was considered a party favorite for the presidential nomination, but he has yet to announce his candidacy. The president and the vice president are elected separately in the Philippines. If both men were to win, analysts said, Mr. Go could step aside for Mr. Duterte or let him rule the country by proxy, allowing him to escape prosecution.

Sara Duterte, the president’s daughter and the mayor of Davao City, said she would not seek the presidency if her father continued with his plans to run for vice president.

All candidate must submit their final filings in October.

Mr. Pacquiao, 42, signaled a break with Mr. Duterte earlier this year when he accused the government’s health department of corruption tied to the coronavirus pandemic and the purchasing of face masks and other protective equipment. The senator, who as a boxer won world titles in a record eight weight classes, was once an ally of Mr. Duterte, but recently became more critical of the president.

“We are ready to rise to the challenge of leadership,” Mr. Pacquiao said on Sunday when he accepted the nomination from his faction of the party.

“It is now time for the oppressed to win,” he said. “It is now time for the country to rise up from poverty.”

Aries Arugay, a political science professor at the University of the Philippines, said that he was not surprised by Mr. Pacquiao’s announcement but that the boxer may be in over his head. While Mr. Pacquiao is internationally recognized, “he is not ready” to be president, Mr. Arugay said, adding that Mr. Pacquiao had not passed any major legislation.

“His performance at the Senate was underwhelming,” he said. “However, that has not prevented people and politicians in the past from winning public office.”

Mr. Pacquiao has also been a vocal supporter of Mr. Duterte’s bloody antidrug campaign.

The Commission on Elections will have to settle the matter of the separate factions of the PDP-Laban before the final candidacies are filed in October. If Mr. Duterte’s faction emerges with a clear mandate, Mr. Pacquiao will likely step aside or run as an independent, chipping away at Mr. Duterte’s chances of regaining public office, Mr. Arugay said.

Melvin Matibag, the general secretary of PDP-Laban and the leader of the pro-Duterte wing of the party, said that Mr. Pacquiao was acting against the party’s wishes by announcing his candidacy.

The meeting on Sunday during which Mr. Pacquiao announced his candidacy was “not sanctioned nor called by the party’s chairman, President Duterte,” Mr. Matibag said Monday on national radio.

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In a Scheduling First, Pac-12 and SWAC Plan Home-and-Home Basketball Games

Pac-12 leaders similarly welcomed the home-and-home agreement, which Bernard Muir, Stanford’s athletic director, predicted would “open our eyes and our fan bases to an opportunity that we don’t traditionally get.”

“Certainly, there’s games that occur between Power 5s and H.B.C.U.s, but to do this across the board in both conferences, I think it’s really unique,” he said.

Dana Altman, Oregon’s coach since 2010, said he expected the trips to become important learning experiences for players in the two leagues. In an interview, he recalled a 1999 trip to Mississippi Valley State, in Itta Bena, Miss., with one of his Creighton teams as revelatory.

“It was good at the time, just that our guys went to a small campus in a very small town,” said Altman, who once had Florida A&M’s coach, Robert McCullum, on his staff at Oregon. “I think this trip will be good for our players, especially when they learn about the school and get some of the history of the school.”

Some SWAC schools, officials said, are considering playing their home games under the arrangement at bigger, off-campus arenas in their areas.

Although the SWAC commands large home crowds for football games — the most of any conference outside the Power 5 or Group of 5 leagues that dominate Division I football — it has struggled to draw audiences for men’s basketball. For the 2019-20 season, the league ranked 29th of the 32 Division I conferences in home basketball attendance, and its schools averaged fewer than 1,600 people per home game.

The Pac-12’s schools, by contrast, typically drew more than 7,000 fans per game.

Jason Cable, the athletic director at Alabama State, said U.S.C.’s appearance there in 2023 would be the university’s most significant nonconference game at home in memory. He said that the exposure and opportunity would be valuable to a university like Alabama State, the lone Division I school in Montgomery, and he predicted that those benefits would outweigh the value of a check that would be earned through another road trip.

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The Mannings Give TV Sports Yet Another Alternate Viewing Option

“We really lean into a specific driver for a little bit longer, and it creates a stronger bond between the driver and audience,” Flood said.

If the future of sports watching is fans choosing exactly the kind of announcer or experience they want, why not take the idea further? Amazon, which shows N.F.L. games on Thursdays and owns the rights for a number of different sports in Europe, already provides several different commentary streams for those games.

But Amazon also owns Twitch, the streaming platform most heavily associated with video games — where at any given moment you can find thousands of people, some of them professionals with a huge audience and some of them amateurs with no audience, commenting while playing video games or doing other things. Amazon has shown some games on Twitch with handpicked and hired hosts, but it is not a free-for-all open to thousands of different commentators.

For one, there is a rights issue. The N.F.L. sells Amazon the right to do very specific things, which does not include allowing anybody who wants to comment on games on Twitch, and therefore allow anybody to watch on Twitch and bypass traditional ways of viewing.

But even if they could do so, Marie Donoghue, the head of global sports at Amazon, is not sure they would want to. “We don’t know if infinite choice is what fans want,” she said. “We do think fans want great optionality, but we have to learn, because if you give fans infinite choice it may become overwhelming, and they get lost in the experience.”

Infinite may not be on the horizon then, but more certainly is.

Next year, when Amazon actually produces the N.F.L. games they show, there will almost certainly be more options. Meier said Triller was getting ready to “rock the world with a completely new concept” in boxing, while Rolón said ESPN would expand its alternate telecasts as technology allowed it to do so.

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